“Surgery is Not the End”

 

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Just Me.

Wow. Profound?

 

It really isn’t the end, it’s really a beginning… I am a member of several facebook groups/pages relating to one type of bariatric surgery or another and over the past year and a half have seen people who are succeeding and people who are maybe not succeeding as much as they might have if they were staying true to the path we are supposed to be on.

The path is: Eat less – Lose weight – maintain healthy weight. Simple as that…really…(we all know it can be / is sometimes hard!)

Today I came across this page on Dr. Nowzaradan’s website and it really made perfect sense to me…I guess as long as I keep myself on the path that’s all I really need to be concerned about.

Surgery is Not the End

Surgery is not a magic bullet for weight control. Because there may be any number of environmental, lifestyle or psychological factors that contributed to an individual’s weight problems, these issues continue to be a source of conflict and struggle in the lives of those who have undergone weight loss surgery. Surgery addresses some of the mechanics of calorie consumption, but the underlying causes of caloric over consumption may remain. Patients must examine the root causes of their weight problem and face the issues head on.

Obesity is caused by only one thing: consuming more calories than you expend (see What is Obesity?). Of course there may always be influences in one’s life that make the conditions ripe for such excessive consumption or lack of caloric expenditure, but the basic reason that obesity occurs is quite simple.

Food is always present in our lives. It is a demonstration of abundance, affluence, love, comfort and satisfaction. While you may have decided to fight your weight battle with surgery, others close to you may not have made the same decision, and you may find yourself surrounded by the same foods after surgery that you were before.

Because of the various symbolic characteristics that food possesses in all cultures, we often find ourselves associating food with psychological voids in our lives. If over eating had been a compulsion or addiction for you prior to surgery, be aware that once surgery is performed, you may face other addictive behaviors such as gambling, alcoholism, promiscuity or drug use.

Unfortunately, while weight loss surgery marks the end of one path; it often is the beginning of another. It is important to connect with other people who face similar struggles and who are experiencing similar journeys in order for you to reach long-term success.


The Benefits of Peer Support
 

Support groups are designed to help you manage your post-surgical emotions and struggles. Here, you will find others who have undergone similar experiences before and after surgery. You will foster long lasting supportive friendships. You will find people who may understand your unique struggles better than your closest life long friend or tour dearest family member. You will have the opportunity to network, build business relationships, share laughter and share tears.Support groups should be attended even before your surgery so that you can collect a variety of opinions, become aware of a variety of concerns, fears and struggles, and create a well-rounded expectation for yourself. Listen to the stories that others have to share. Find guidance and answers to questions that are unique to people who face the struggles of the obese. You will be surprised at what you will learn and the stories you will hear.

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